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SUMMER OF COOL NEW SANDWICHES

Art and video games and game opinions and cartoons and comics and
Sep 20 '14

durbikins:

DIAMOND DOG

1,402 notes (via skankplissken & durbikins)Tags: rebloggerjak game of the year

Sep 20 '14

(Source: diamond-doge)

1,221 notes (via skankplissken & diamond-doge)Tags: rebloggerjak i need this

Sep 19 '14
krudman:

protomlad:

happyd00dle:

matt-hews-blog:

My body is ready

gaaasssppp!!!

GIVE THEM 
TO ME
NOW

Are these Nintendo made? I’ve seen them elsewhere and they look too nice not to be Nintendo made (the colors, and the acrylic buttons), but different enough that I wonder (the buttons and the c-stick are different).

They’re not Nintendo-made, but Nintendo-endorsed PDP controllers. Basically they’re about as close as you can get to first-party quality. The cool thing is, they classify as Classic Pro controllers rather than GameCube controllers, so you can use them for Virtual Console stuff as well.

krudman:

protomlad:

happyd00dle:

matt-hews-blog:

My body is ready

gaaasssppp!!!

GIVE THEM 

TO ME

NOW

Are these Nintendo made? I’ve seen them elsewhere and they look too nice not to be Nintendo made (the colors, and the acrylic buttons), but different enough that I wonder (the buttons and the c-stick are different).

They’re not Nintendo-made, but Nintendo-endorsed PDP controllers. Basically they’re about as close as you can get to first-party quality. The cool thing is, they classify as Classic Pro controllers rather than GameCube controllers, so you can use them for Virtual Console stuff as well.

3,828 notes (via krudman & matt-hews-blog)Tags: rebloggerjak

Sep 19 '14

theprettiestbear:

I feel like a lot of people also don’t understand that the reason a lot of these “safer” titles get put out, is so companies can put money towards more ambitious, and by extension, less financially secure titles. Which I can’t blame them all that much for IMO. 

I think the problem is that a lot of the companies in question are owned by or are tied to larger publishers, so they can’t take those kinds of risks. There are certainly some companies that go out of their way to fund weird stuff, like Sony, but third-party companies that aren’t owned by a publisher can occasionally get that freedom — but it depends on how well that financially safe title does.

Which is why you see a lot of industry vets bailing on bigger companies to form new start-ups, because it’s no longer possible for them to work on smaller titles otherwise.

So, you’re right, but it isn’t always a reality for many developers due to the way finances often work. Many companies make enough to stay afloat or keep the doors open, but little else. Companies like Devolver and now DoubleFine can back some of the weird stuff these days, though, and THANKFULLY console manufacturers are dropping a lot of dev fees and making it easier to get something on a platform of your choice, so there’s at least fewer barriers of entry than there used to be, without necessarily risking flooding the market.

(Source: anderjak)

6 notes (via theprettiestbear & anderjak)Tags: rebloggerjak theprettiestbear bloggerjak replies

Sep 19 '14

All I can do these days is talk about video games.

I should probably draw at least once this week.

2 notes Tags: bloggerjak meds have been fucking with me but i am starting new meds this week so maybe this will change

Sep 19 '14

It’s weird. I like Call of Duty, despite the fact that I stopped playing any part of the franchise past Black Ops 1, and I like Assassin’s Creed despite the fact that I probably won’t finish Black Flag, and am likely to not purchase any future entries for at least a couple of years. I can say this because, for the most part, the core experience remains largely the same, and there’s not a heck of a lot of reason to buy more than one every few years save for narrative continuity, a lesson I learned perhaps a few entries to late to both franchises.

Like, that’s my thing with Triple-A these days: I’m becoming more aware of how unstimulating they can be. Yes, they’re fun, oftentimes polished to a sheen where there’s very little material that stops you from having that kind of fun. I played CoD on Veteran on each release before I did anything else, which is not something I do for any other game. I 100%ed multiple AC games, and played through some of them multiple times, just because I could. After a while, I became startlingly aware of why I kept doing this: Because the core mechanics are the glue that holds an otherwise uninteresting product together, and the story is the bait — not meant to nourish but entice, because very rarely is it that the narrative to these games offers any food for thought beyond the credits.

And I’m also aware that it’s so easy to shit on Triple-A titles for this reason. They’re meant for mass consumption; they are popular media. They’re supposed to be readily consumed ad nauseum with no regard for long-term appeal, because they aren’t given the time or means to be otherwise. And the teams behind these games are ridiculously talented, because it’s incredibly difficult to make a game that people want to play more than once, or play for dozens of hours, when “meaningful” content may only last a few hours at most.

This isn’t to say it’s a particularly new concept; games have been pulling maneuvers like these since the beginning, with artificial difficulty and limited lives/continues, cheap deaths, and tons of other insidious tricks in order to make you believe you’re getting a long-lasting (and not just unnecessarily difficult) experience. We’re merely adapting technology and new means of distribution and the meaning of consumable content to a new era, so we’re literally just eating differently-branded media that’s only a certain percentage different from a previous formula — not to necessarily compare Assassin’s Creed to an NES title of any particular quality, mind you, but to point out the tactics utilized by companies to make content perceived to be monetarily valuable, and to shoot down this idea that there was any sort of “golden era” for ethics in game design and distribution.

This is kind of a wander-y post, and I sort of apologize for that, but it’s largely a result of the way my mind has been shifting regarding the industry over the past few years. I still have the same passion and excitement I used to have for compelling and interesting games, but I’m finally coming to terms with the tactics utilized to make me want to buy everything under the sun, while still appreciating what goes into those same kind of “un-nourishing” titles. Sort of the way someone might appreciate the production of a really catchy if overly simplistic pop song. Which, honestly, isn’t a far-reach comparison to the games industry.

6 notes Tags: gamerjak

Sep 19 '14
obscurevideogames:

ultrace:

Title splash graphics extracted from Tecmo’s Deroon DeroDero, a 1995 color-block-matching game with a cute gummy/jelly motif to the blocks. Warning: Image may exceed recommended daily allowance of Japanese anime/video game culture or stereotypes.

Puyo Puyo-style arcade puzzle game known outside of Japan (on the Playstation) as Tecmo Stackers

obscurevideogames:

ultrace:

Title splash graphics extracted from Tecmo’s Deroon DeroDero, a 1995 color-block-matching game with a cute gummy/jelly motif to the blocks. Warning: Image may exceed recommended daily allowance of Japanese anime/video game culture or stereotypes.

Puyo Puyo-style arcade puzzle game known outside of Japan (on the Playstation) as Tecmo Stackers

86 notes (via ggghosttown & ultrace)Tags: rebloggerjak every 90's anime in one picture folks gamerjak

Sep 19 '14

epistemotypus:

anderjak:

Feel free to discredit my opinion as I preferred Brawl over Melee for the longest time, even though that was largely because I was around a whole bunch of people who were SO into Melee that it reached the point of fervent obsession. It’s really easy to get tired of that discussion, of the flaws of Brawl, when that makes up more than half of the Smash conversation you get.

So maybe I enjoyed Brawl out of spite. Who knows. Whatever the case, I annoyed the shit out of people with Snake for a year, and that’s worth the money I paid for it right there.

IMO: for all the flaws Brawl had, there is one thing it introduced that makes it leagues better than Melee, and it bothers me that Project M people took it out, and that’s multiple air dodges. I get that getting back to the stage is a battle in itself, but it never really made any sense. You don’t fall prone after roll dodging. Your shield doesn’t just vanish. Why did Melee have a one-time air dodge? Why is that the preferred “competitive” option?

I mean, granted, the buffer between dodges could have been lengthened a bit, but just. Either you can dodge the attack, and fall to your death, or you can attempt your recovery move, get hit, and fall to your death. Or you can not bother, b/c it’s a waste of time no matter what you do.

I will happily take randomly tripping if it means I get to air dodge to my heart’s content.

I think that might be why I didn’t care for Project M: It considered everything Brawl introduced irrelevant, simply by merit of not being Melee. Modders were capable of some really incredible things with it (and they continue to add to it to this day), but doing a wholesale conversion feels… I don’t want to say “pointless.” Certainly misguided, from a game design standpoint. But they have fun, and people enjoy it, so I can’t bash it too much. There’s fun to be had in taking more recent tech to convert into older games.

Maybe I am just craving for modders to create, I’unno, Smash Bros Omega or something. A unique experience that sets itself apart from the franchise as a whole with altered mechanics and rebalancing. That could very well be it.

12 notes (via epistemotypus & anderjak)Tags: rebloggerjak epistemotypus replies bloggerjak

Sep 19 '14

Even after Brawl released, Melee was still the soup du jour for Smashers for a good while; heck, Brawl even increased interest in Melee after the fact, thanks to undertakings like Project M. I’m not necessarily a fan of Project M as a whole, but it did sort of prove the notion that each Smash entry is supposed to be treated separately as unique, individual, lasting products, rather than as Super or Ultra versions of the previous project. If Smash Bros 64 is Street Fighter II, then Melee is Street Fighter III. (And I guess this is where some people would say Brawl is Street Fighter EX or 1, which is really mean.)

That’s the thing I really like about Nintendo products as a whole: Sequels do not necessarily invalidate previous titles. They all stand on their own as individual products, even the competitive ones like Mario Kart, and save for online functionality, it’s easy to go back and enjoy the nuances of each title, because you know you can’t get that feeling even from later ones. It’s not as though the sequels are somehow inferior, but they are certainly not trying to be the “improved” version of a previous title — just different.

It’s not a feeling that happens across the industry as a whole, and it’s something I hope becomes retained in the future. When individual titles lose their identity as they grow into full franchises (like, say, Assassin’s Creed, which has since lost a LOT of its individual identity even by its third console entry), it showcases the weakness of their foundational appeal.

I won’t say Nintendo is the only company that manages this, but they are very unique in how they’ve handled this for so long. Sometimes I think the heads of the company are right in stating “Nintendo” should be its own genre, at least some days.

3 notes Tags: gamerjak

Sep 19 '14
@_@ I cant wait

It’s so good. I feel myself prepping to get way into it. There is a very good chance I’ll be unlocking a majority of the secret Smashers via versus matches as opposed to the solo methods this time around.

Tags: modernmodron bloggerjak replies

Sep 19 '14

Feel free to discredit my opinion as I preferred Brawl over Melee for the longest time, even though that was largely because I was around a whole bunch of people who were SO into Melee that it reached the point of fervent obsession. It’s really easy to get tired of that discussion, of the flaws of Brawl, when that makes up more than half of the Smash conversation you get.

So maybe I enjoyed Brawl out of spite. Who knows. Whatever the case, I annoyed the shit out of people with Snake for a year, and that’s worth the money I paid for it right there.

12 notes Tags: bloggerjak

Sep 19 '14

Played the new demo of Smash finally.

Far as I can wager, it’s not the same demo Club Nintendo Platinum members got, which is fine. Local-only multiplayer, five characters, and one stage (with Final Destination variant). I was largely just interested in Mega Man and Villager, so this was convenient on my end.

The game definitely feels tighter than Brawl, and a little more intense, but I feel like the Circle Pad is a terrible fit for this. Hopefully I can switch to the D-Pad in the final release, but it’s something I can bear. (Then again, I hate using analog sticks for anything that has restricted 8-way movement. So I’m biased.)

Mega Man is definitely the more interesting of the two selectable newcomers; his regular attack combo allows him full mobility and doesn’t end with a smash at the end, which means he can pepper enemies with minimal risk, but the sad trade-off is the hopelessly minimal damage. Thankfully, his buster attack forward smash seems to make up for the damage, and has some nice range. Charging the smash gives off a VERY satisfying bigger buster attack, but it’s incredibly tricky to land; I’m hoping the damage offset will be enough to make up for it, because it’s a potent-as-hell maneuver. It’s generally just a very risky maneuver to begin with, though, especially against anyone with a Reflect maneuver; I’ve been on the receiving end of a majority of my attacks thanks to jumping right into lv7 and 9 difficulty characters, and boy have I found myself flying.

Still, his specials are nice. The Metal Blade and Crash Bomb are nice, if very samey in initial execution (good for mix-up, possibly), and the Rush Spring gives a really nice height, even if MM’s horizontal air options are way limited. He’s got a lot of really cool regular smashes and air maneuvers that are fun to watch and seem like they’d be really effective with a better player, so I’ll need to spend more time with him.

Villager feels, to me, like a replacement for Snake from Brawl; he’s got a number of somewhat similar moves and seems to require a similar mindset, requiring a bit longer setup for a better payoff. He lacks the raw power of some of Snake’s smash attacks, but he makes up for it by being able to pocket damn near any projectile. Their Gyroid Rocket ability is a good potential mix-up thanks to both being a regular rocket and a horizontal dash if needed, so I see myself making regular use of that.

For the life of me, I can’t find a lot of use for their Down-B special, though; it’s the three stages of dealing with a tree, by planting, watering, and chopping it down. It produces a wood block to throw, and the springing-up of the tree and it falling down can deal damage, but the timing is pretty tricky. It’s definitely one of those moves that isn’t incredibly noticeable due to the proportions of the Villager concealing their movements a bit.

Either way, both characters were way easier to jump into than I expected, and I was surprised by the little changes to the other characters (Link’s running smash can now leap over certain attacks, which could fuck with some veterans pretty well for a brief time), so I’m way satisfied. I enjoyed Melee and Brawl as two very separate experiences, and I feel like they struck on a good balancing point between the two, combining their positives into a cohesive whole, just based on the content I’ve been able to mess with. Playing on the 3DS with this game is definitely awkward at first, especially on a larger XL unit, due to the shoulder buttons not being as accessible as my usual GameCube controller, but the core gameplay is so satisfying that I’m willing to overcome that awkwardness.

Also, any game that can have a locked framerate with the 3D on gets my vote. It’s all buttery-smooth, and the load times aren’t nearly as long as I expected, so a lot of my initial worries are alleviated. Not that there was any chance I wasn’t going to pick it up on midnight release.

6 notes Tags: gamerjak

Sep 18 '14

teantacles:

anderjak:

silenthaven:

Silent Hills concept video revealed at TGS 2014!

Wtf am I watching??

I feel like it’s worth a reminder:

This is a concept video specifically for PT, with Silent Hills in mind. They’ve stated at E3 that PT is significantly scaled back to look like an indie title, which means there is at least a good chance Silent Hills in full could be in the ballpark of the above video.

It is, of course, completely unlikely things will feel as organically driven and executed as above, but it’s a very interesting sign of things to come. It’ll be the first entry in the franchise to not use familiar monsters and concepts since SH4, when the franchise left Japanese development, so this is a good sign we’ll be seeing a bigger return to form.

SH revolutionized horror in games on the PSX and elevated things on PS2; it’d be great to see it make up for lost time on new consoles.

I REALLY REALLY hope the final game isn’t first person. I was hoping it was just the teaser that was in first person and the final game would be third person, like Silent Hill has always been.

I sincerely doubt it will be. Kojima loves his main characters perhaps too much. He also loves Norman Reedus, and you know he’s not going to miss an opportunity to show us Reedus as often as possible in that new-fangled Fox Engine.

He also gets motion sickness from games, which is why we didn’t have an unlocked camera til the update to MGS3, Subsistence. PT is short and doesn’t jar you much, but anything longer than that and he probably wouldn’t be able to play his own game.

It’s unlikely he’ll ever make an exclusively first-person title in his career outside of PT for those reasons, and I have no doubt Silent Hills will remain, by and large, a third-person game, as we’ve come to expect from the franchise as a whole.

6,912 notes (via teantacles & silenthaven)Tags: rebloggerjak replies teantacles

Sep 18 '14

bolto asked:

i love hearing u talk about games youre like this beautiful monk that wanders out of a cave every now and again to impart the most wizened knowledge of video games on the plebeians below you

i need to invest in more robes, clearly

10 notes Tags: askjak bolto replies

Sep 18 '14

silenthaven:

Silent Hills concept video revealed at TGS 2014!

Wtf am I watching??

I feel like it’s worth a reminder:

This is a concept video specifically for PT, with Silent Hills in mind. They’ve stated at E3 that PT is significantly scaled back to look like an indie title, which means there is at least a good chance Silent Hills in full could be in the ballpark of the above video.

It is, of course, completely unlikely things will feel as organically driven and executed as above, but it’s a very interesting sign of things to come. It’ll be the first entry in the franchise to not use familiar monsters and concepts since SH4, when the franchise left Japanese development, so this is a good sign we’ll be seeing a bigger return to form.

SH revolutionized horror in games on the PSX and elevated things on PS2; it’d be great to see it make up for lost time on new consoles.

6,912 notes (via bolto & silenthaven)Tags: rebloggerjak gamerjak PT silent hills